Counsellor and Support Person Specific Actions


Before Disaster

Actions for Gender Equity

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Encourage individuals to develop their strengths beyond gendered expectations. [/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Develop and promote gender-appropriate counselling for men that takes masculinity issues into account, including in crisis situations such as natural disasters.[/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]

Surviving Disaster

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Lobby for the right of clients to have a continuing counselling relationship wherever possible, e.g. with ESOs which may terminate counselling arrangements. [/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Investigate ways of supporting men in the aftermath of a disaster, in the knowledge that they are often reluctant to seek formal counselling [/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Investigate effective counselling for emergency services workers in the immediate post disaster period-particularly in male-dominated organisations (see, e.g. Dr Michelle Tuckey)[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Investigate alternative ways to support men, e.g. through community-oriented action groups, or in social clean-up events. [/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]

Domestic Violence

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Ask about DV. Name it. Know how to respond to protect women and children and refer men to support services or men’s behaviour change programs.[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Attend Family Violence after Natural Disaster training to develop awareness of the way DV is excused after disaster.[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Apply to join disaster preparation groups at Local Government or State Government levels to advocate for the needs of women in DV and men post-disaster.[/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]

General Actions


Actions for Gender Equity

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Recognise that the way men and women act is often the result of social conditioning and these gendered roles can leave women at a disadvantage both during and after disasters[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Resist stereotypes —base all initiatives on knowledge of difference and specific cultural, economic, political and sexual context, not generalisations (Gender and Disasters Network 2005 p. 159).[/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]

Surviving Disaster

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Before, during, and after disasters, challenge expectations that men will behave in a defined ‘masculine’ way – encourage expression of emotion. [/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]

Domestic Violence

[x_icon_list][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Be aware that women are at increased risk of violence. Understand that disaster is no excuse for DV.[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Name it: Say the word ‘violent’- not ‘stressed’ and ‘angry’.[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Follow the 4 steps to support someone suffering domestic violence after a disaster.[/x_icon_list_item][x_icon_list_item type=”square-o”]Undertake training in identifying domestic violence after disaster, e.g. (provide Iink to our training on this site).[/x_icon_list_item][/x_icon_list]