Family violence in recovery

Last month, the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience invited the GAD Pod to present on ‘Family Violence in Recovery’ as part of its 2021 Webinar series. We decided to begin our “Gender Justice in Disaster” conference Lead-In Sessions with this webinar. This webinar captures both the original research with women and men after Black Saturday and our evolving knowledge of the gendered impacts of disasters, including COVID-19.

While these sessions are open access, it is necessary to register for the conference to access the conference itself, and to attend The Wheeler Centre launch on May 4. Recordings of these conference sessions will not be available beyond conference delegates until 2022.

Please register for the conference to be part of cutting edge discussions from leading experts and current decision-makers in intersecting sectors of emergency management, violence against women, LGBTIQA+, First Nations People, design and disaster, the media, and more.

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Journalists' Panel with views across continents and cultures on disaster reporting

This in-depth video covers how to report on a disaster that is ‘the worst day’ of many people’s lives. Whether bushfire, floods, or pandemics, reporting is essential, yet at the same time, is an ethical minefield. The context is fraught with deadlines and high stakes, including individual impacts and the long-term of disaster recovery and resilience.

In this video, the GAD Pod’s Naomi Bailey interviews Stephanie Corsetti, News Journalist with SBS, and Rebecca Hersher, Science Reporter with NPR in Washington US.

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The intersection of human rights and climate justice in Coonabarabran – and beyond

This video should be compulsory watching and listening for all levels of Government and for anyone at risk of forced migration. Professor Susan Harris-Rimmer points out that this is a significant proportion of the Australian population. Populations across the world are at risk as, year after year, predictions of climate change’s devastation come true. Even cities are threatened. The implications for the insurance industry are deep, with consequences for vulnerable areas and individual householders. Uninsurable homes lead to lower property values and dwindling populations. Gender is central to this examination of risk, as women’s poverty exacerbates the damage of disasters like floods, bushfires and cyclones.
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Indigenous fire knowledge and land management practice

Indigenous fire knowledge and land management practice – a sustainable way of life and an innovative approach to climate change’s catastrophic bushfire.

‘You can’t tell our children that all the emus will be gone …’

This is a conversation between Victor Steffensen, an Indigenous writer, filmmaker, musician and consultant and Steve O’Malley, a fire-fighter of 30+ years.

Indigenous land management is based on prevention, and working with the land and the elements. In contrast, so much human response to extreme weather events and disasters worldwide is based on man (literally) attempting to prevail over nature. Victor Steffensen speaks of ‘young’ knowledge systems that don’t respect or understand old knowledge systems and the protocols around them. Instead, young knowledge systems need to keep advance Indigenous knowledge, and allow it to demonstrate its value. “There’s beautiful roses on both sides of the fence. Western science has a wealth of advanced technology that can help, and Aboriginal knowledge has a wealth of knowledge of the landscape from thousands of years’ experience, and if only they could work together and respect each other in the right way, we could move mountains.”

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Feminist Understandings of Climate Change

This is a short 6-minute lead-in session! Sydney Environment Institute’s, Dr Blanche Verlie speaks about feminist understandings of climate change and how this can inform approaches to climate activism. The aim is to progress gender justice. Blanche points to several valuable climate change articles by feminist authors, and introduces new intellectual concepts, such as ‘outsourcing’ the emotional experience of climate change. She concludes this introduction by stating that challenging gender norms is a foundation for liveable climates.
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The National GEM Guidelines – new sections

Susan speaks with Jaspreet Kaur, Krissy Nicholson and Karleen Gribble on the new sections being added to the Gender and Emergency Management Guidelines.

The conversation will consider how organisations can use the checklist to improve their service provision. The checklist includes the needs of women, and people of diverse gender and sexual identities in all aspects of disaster planning.

Jaspreet and Krissy talk about their gendered evacuation and relief centre checklist and upcoming action-workshop with the City of Casey. The workshop includes scenario-based sessions to consider the practicalities involved in actioning and implementing the checklists.

Karleen is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Western Sydney University and will present on the new pregnant and breastfeeding mothers’ section of the GEM guidelines, and outlines what she would like to see happen with the checklist once complete.

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Women in fire and emergency leadership: Reflections on the UK and Australian experiences and ideas for systemic change in gender inclusion.

Women in fire and emergency leadership: Reflections on the UK and Australian experiences and ideas for systemic change in gender inclusion.

Join us as Commander Donna Wheatley talks to four inspiring women, all of whom have faced barriers – and overcome them – to become leaders within their communities and organisations. In conversation with Donna are:

Alex Johnson - Chief Fire Officer, South Yorkshire Fire & Rescue UK, named “Most Influential Woman in Fire” in 2019
Dawn Hartog (She/Her) - Captain, Toolangi Fire Brigade and Senior Program Manager, FFMVic, Culture and Diversity
Quinn Cramer - President of Women and Firefighting Australasia
Becci Bryant QFSM MBA MIFireE Hon DPP - Chief Fire Officer, Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service HQ Pirehill Stone, Staffordshire, UK

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LGBTIQA+ experiences in Disaster and Recovery

The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience invited Liam Leonard and Steve O’Malley AFSM from the GAD Pod to present on ‘LGBTIQA+ experiences in Disaster and Recovery’ - during the MidSumma festival - as part of AIDR’s 2021 Webinar series.

A small but growing body of research suggests some LGBTIQA+ people are reluctant to access help in a disaster because of historic and ongoing discrimination and abuse experienced toward them and their communities. Liam and Steve explore how emergency organisations (and others) can work towards inclusive practice and services that meet the needs of LGBTIQA+ communities during and after disasters – including COVID-19.

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A decade’s reflections on disaster risk and recovery for women, men and children.

Join Amanda Kelly, CEO of WHGNE, Daryl Taylor and Jodie Thornycroft, two Kinglake residents as they reflect a decade on from Black Saturday and disaster risk and recovery for women, men and children.
 

Community Process in Disaster

In this presentation for the Gender Justice in Disaster Conference, Dr Rob Gordon conveys the social and individual impacts of disasters on people across the world. Dr Rob Gordon is well known to disaster-affected communities across Australia. He is a clinical psychologist and trauma expert, and, for more than forty years – from Ash Wednesday in 1983 to COVID-19 – he has studied disaster’s effects and worked with individuals and communities in recovery. He notes that the loss of privacy that accompanies disasters can result in a loss of intimacy. He reflects on gender and the role this plays in disaster experience. He notes that ‘Gender stereotypes undermine our common humanity’.
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Long-term disaster resilience: The experiences and wisdom of men, women and children

In this Lead-In Session, Sharon Bourke, Ruth McGowan, Dianne Simpson, Lindy and Keith Wrest and Jodie Thorneycroft speak speak directly on their decade or more of recovery after devastating Australian bushfires and floods. Their experiences and insight shine through, providing advice - and challenges - for decision makers in disaster recovery. One key message is that building social capacity as well as capital works post-disaster is critically important, and needs to be sustained against a backdrop of community fatigue. The exhaustion lasts decades, yet there are words of hope. This research was funded by the Natural Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme, launched in 2019 and received the Resilient Australia Award for Victoria.

The full report is available here